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Golden Age: Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga Series, Book 3
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From the winner of the Pulitzer Prize: the much-anticipated final volume, following Some Luck and Early Warning, of her acclaimed American trilogya richly absorbing new novel that brings the remarkable Langdon family into our present times and beyond A lot can happen in one hundred years, as Jane Smiley shows to dazzling effect in her Last Hundred Years trilogy. But as Golden Age, its final installment, opens in 1987, the next generation of Langdons face economic, social, political—and personal—challenges unlike anything their ancestors have encountered before. Michael and Richie, the rivalrous twin sons of World War II hero Frank, work in the high-stakes world of government and finance in Washington and New York, but they soon realize that one's fiercest enemies can be closest to home; Charlie, the charming, recently found scion, struggles with whether he wishes to make a mark on the world; and Guthrie, once poised to take over the Langdons' Iowa farm, is instead deployed to Iraq, leaving the land—ever the heart of this compelling saga—in the capable hands of his younger sister. Determined to evade disaster, for the planet and her family, Felicity worries that the farm's once-bountiful soil may be permanently imperiled, by more than the extremes of climate change. And as they enter deeper into the twenty-first century, all the Langdon women—wives, mothers, daughters—find themselves charged with carrying their storied past into an uncertain future. Combining intimate drama, emotional suspense, and a full command of history, Golden Age brings to a magnificent conclusion the century-spanning portrait of this unforgettable family—and the dynamic times in which they've loved, lived, and died: a crowning literary achievement from a beloved master of American storytelling.

From the Hardcover edition.
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Street Date:
10/20/2015
Language:
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ISBN:
9780385352444
ASIN:
B00WPQ9904
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APA Citation (style guide)

Jane Smiley. (2015). Golden Age: Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga Series, Book 3. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Jane Smiley. 2015. Golden Age: Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga Series, Book 3. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Jane Smiley, Golden Age: Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga Series, Book 3. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2015.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Jane Smiley. Golden Age: Last Hundred Years: A Family Saga Series, Book 3. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2015. Web.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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      • bioText: JANE SMILEY is the author of numerous novels, including A Thousand Acres, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, and most recently, Some Luck and Early Warning, the first volumes of The Last Hundred Years trilogy. She is also the author of five works of nonfiction and a series of books for young adults. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she has received the PEN USA Lifetime Achievement Award for Literature. She lives in Northern California.

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From the winner of the Pulitzer Prize: the much-anticipated final volume, following Some Luck and Early Warning, of her acclaimed American trilogya richly absorbing new novel that brings the remarkable Langdon family into our present times and beyond

A lot can happen in one hundred years, as Jane Smiley shows to dazzling effect in her Last Hundred Years trilogy. But as Golden Age, its final installment, opens in 1987, the next generation of Langdons face economic, social, political—and personal—challenges unlike anything their ancestors have encountered before.
Michael and Richie, the rivalrous twin sons of World War II hero Frank, work in the high-stakes world of government and finance in Washington and New York, but they soon realize that one's fiercest enemies can be closest to home; Charlie, the charming, recently found scion, struggles with whether he wishes to make a mark on the world; and Guthrie, once poised to take over the Langdons' Iowa farm, is instead deployed to Iraq, leaving the land—ever the heart of this compelling saga—in the capable hands of his younger sister.
Determined to evade disaster, for the planet and her family, Felicity worries that the farm's once-bountiful soil may be permanently imperiled, by more than the extremes of climate change. And as they enter deeper into the twenty-first century, all the Langdon women—wives, mothers, daughters—find themselves charged with carrying their storied past into an uncertain future.
Combining intimate drama, emotional suspense, and a full command of history, Golden Age brings to a magnificent conclusion the century-spanning portrait of this unforgettable family—and the dynamic times in which they've loved, lived, and died: a crowning literary achievement from a beloved master of American storytelling.


From the Hardcover edition.
reviews
      • premium: False
      • source: Dana De Greff, Miami New Times
      • content: "The thought of writing a series that spans a century with each chapter representing a year might sound daunting to some authors. Jane Smiley, however, is not just any author . . . Golden Age takes readers from 1987 up to 2020, lending a prophetic eye to the world beyond the pages. There's much to admire: Smiley's attention to detail in each and every year; her knowledge of politics, environmentalism, and genetics; her humor; her stripped back prose. On the farm, descriptions of the land put you right in the heart of a place that is rapidly disappearing . . . Smiley chronicles 20th-century life like few have, with the same scope and fastidiousness of Phillip Roth, Saul Bellow, and John Updike. After reading about five generations of a family, wars, financial crises, global warming, and the rise of the technological age, it makes you stop and think about how much has changed--and yet how little has changed at the same time [in] this place we call the US."
      • premium: False
      • source: Connie Ogle, Miami Herald
      • content: "[In] Smiley's ambitious project of covering 100 years in the life of an Iowa family, the Langdon offspring travel across the country, across the world, even. Members of three different generations find themselves fighting in wars overseas. There are marriages that last and unions that fail. There are sublime moments of peace and contentment and sudden tragedies that knock the survivors (and readers) back a step. But death in a family is inevitable, especially over the lifetimes of many characters . . . The power of memory and nostalgia fuels the trilogy."
      • premium: False
      • source: Jonathan Lee, Financial Times (UK)
      • content: "Bold, satisfying . . . insightful. Smiley is superb when it comes to summing up a character's hopes and insecurities. . . She is an endlessly sensitive explorer of liberty and the abandonments it entails. It will be fascinating to see where she directs her prodigious imagination now. Golden Age is a welcome reminder of her enormous talents as a storyteller."
      • premium: False
      • source: Heller McAlpin, Los Angeles Times
      • content: "With Golden Age, Smiley wraps up her sweeping, cumulatively absorbing American epic--as expansive and ambitious in its way as Balzac's Human Comedy and John Updike's Rabbit quartet . . . References to historical benchmarks anchor the novel in time. But what captivates are the unfolding lives of characters who share DNA and a fraying connection to their agrarian roots . . . Smiley's plot is a marvel of intricacy that's full of surprises. Her view of old age and, especially, old love, are unexpectedly sweet. [The] trilogy demonstrates repeatedly that most lives are a combination of improvisation and serendipity, good luck and bad. With issues such as corruption, climate disruption and racism blighting the country's horizon, her characters wonder if the golden age is behind them. But Claire, the last surviving child of Walter and Rosanna Langdon, reflects on the bright spots of her 80 years, [making] her realize that 'all golden ages, perhaps, were discovered within' . . . A satisfying finale to a monumental portrait of an American family and an American century."
      • premium: False
      • source: Hannah Beckerman, The Guardian
      • content: "It's been almost 25 years since Smiley won the Pulitzer prize for A Thousand Acres. With The Last Hundred Years trilogy, she surely confirms her place alongside Roth, Updike and Bellow as one of the truly great chroniclers of 20th-century American life. Golden Age is breathtaking in its expansiveness, and there is an epic quality to the trilogy as a whole. But Smiley is equally compelling on the domestic and familial. The undeniable craft of Golden Age is the way in which the macro and the micro are inextricably linked. We experience the changing face of 20th-century America through the lives of characters whose defining emotional moments Smiley describes with such economy of language that the dissolution of a marriage, or regrets about a life lived, can be affectingly described in a page or two of prose . . . It is testament to Smiley's storytelling that some of the [characters'] deaths are shocking and unexpected. Other deaths creep through the pages wi
      • premium: True
      • source: Publisher's Weekly
      • content:

        August 3, 2015
        A lot can happen over a hundred years, as Smiley shows in her chronicle of the Langdon family. The first two volumes, Some Luck and Early Warning, took the family from 1919 to 1986; Golden Age completes the trilogy by bringing them to the present, and beyond. As the book opens in 1987, family members are back at the Iowa farmstead to meet a new addition to the clan, a child whose existence was long hidden. But in some ways the bigger event that year is the stock market crash, from which the perpetually angry Michael (son of cold warrior Frank, grandson of farmer Walter) emerges wealthy. The first generation of Langdons survived drought and the Depression, the next prospered in the postwar boom, but now money takes center stage, moving faster and less traceably, enriching some and bankrupting others. The title, readers come to suspect, is an ironic reference to the Gilded Age, another era of boom, bust, and shady dealings; any golden glow is gone when Smiley moves into the future to complete the trilogy’s century span. Unfortunately, 2016 to 2019 feels bare-bones dystopian—less water, more violence. What lingers with readers aren’t the encounters with marquee historical events (Clinton’s sex scandals; 9/11) but Smiley’s detailed depiction of the kaleidoscopic geometries of family, as the Langdons spiral out from Iowa into the larger world, endlessly fracturing and coming back together.

      • premium: True
      • source: Kirkus
      • content:

        August 1, 2015
        The title is decidedly sardonic, given the number of deaths and disasters Smiley inflicts on the Langdon family and kin in the final volume of her Last Hundred Years trilogy (Early Warning, 2015, etc.).Nonetheless, "golden age" seems appropriate for the late-life reconciliation of Frank and Andy Langdon; it's warmly affecting to see the remoteness Andy cultivated over decades of neglect slowly fade as Frank actually shares himself with her-until he's struck by lightning at age 74. Several of his siblings meet less spectacular deaths as the story progresses year by year from 1987 through an imagined 2019, but autumnal musings by the survivors get no more space from this briskly unsentimental author than the maneuvers of the younger generations (a few of whom are somewhat schematically dispatched on 9/11 or scarred for life in the Iraq War). Frank and Andy's son Michael remains as toxic as ever, engaging in ever shadier financial deals that make him one of many villains in the 2008 economic meltdown; his identical twin, Richie, strives to get some distance with a political career but can never entirely disengage from Michael's emotional force field. Their cousin Jesse, who inherited the family farm in Iowa, grapples with the havoc wrought by Monsanto's genetically altered seeds, the impact of climate change on his crops, and the perennial financial insecurity of farmers, always in debt and vulnerable to predatory speculators like Michael. Newly introduced characters like Charlie (hitherto unknown son of a Langdon killed in Vietnam in Early Warning) and his girlfriend, Riley, militant political conscience of her boss, Richie, are welcome additions to Smiley's vibrant gallery of fully fleshed characters, with Henry and Claire remaining the most ruefully appealing of the siblings we first met in Some Luck. The final chapters, which look a scant four years ahead and see nothing but ecological and political bad news, are almost comically bleak-let's hope Smiley isn't as skilled a fortuneteller as she is a storyteller. Despite all the dire events, the narrative energy of masterfully interwoven plotlines always conveys a sense of life as an adventure worth pursuing.

        COPYRIGHT(2015) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

      • premium: True
      • source: Booklist
      • content:

        Starred review from September 1, 2015
        With Golden Age, Smiley grandly concludes her Last Hundred Years trilogy, a multigenerational saga about the Langdons, an Iowa farm family. The story began in 1920 in Some Luck (2014), reached 1986 in Early Warning (2015), and stretches into the very near future in the final installment. In each novel, Smiley has subtly yet pointedly linked forces political, technological, financial, and social to personal lives, tracing in the most organic, unobtrusive, yet clarifying manner the enormous changes that have taken place during the last century. On the farming front, Jesse, the next in line following Walter and Joe, has been running the farm more scientifically than intuitively, with one eye on his computer, and now finds himself shackled with debt and trapped into using genetically modified seeds and environmentally deleterious pesticides. To farm is to live at the mercy of weather, and Smiley is a passionate observer of sun and storms, a theme made exponentially more dire by global warming as Iowa withers in a drought, and Yellowstone burns. Another ongoing theme brought to new depths here is the ripple effect of war. Jesse and Jen's son, Guthrie, serves in Iraq, then returns home physically intact but psychically injured. Smiley does revel in the blissfulness of being, celebrating the glory of horses, the good company of dogs, the sweet astonishment of quickening life and newborn babies, the sheltering intimacy of a loving marriage, the pleasure of solitude. She wryly tracks the slow march toward gender equality through the experiences of the Langdon girls and women, including free-spirited Felicity, who, after realizing that her first passion, the veterinary profession, is not right for her, joins the Occupy movement. As she introduces new faces, Smiley extends the lives of characters readers have become involved with, including Chicago-based history professor Henry, whose ex-lover, Philip, has died of AIDs, and the now happily liberated Claire. Heretofore vaporous Andy turns elegantly steely as her and Frank's diametrically and, ultimately, catastrophically opposed twins achieve fame and notoriety when Richie becomes a U.S. congressman and Michael grows obscenely rich and malevolent as a monster of Wall Street . Smiley sustains an enthralling narrative velocity and buoyancy, punctuated with ricocheting dialogue, as she creates a spectacular amplitude of characters, emotions, and events. Sensuousness, dread, recognition, shock, sorrow, mischievous humor, revelation, empathyall are generated by Smiley's fluid, precisely calibrated prose, abiding connection to the terrain she maps, fascination with her characters, and command of the nuances of their predicaments. Each novel is a whole and vital world in its own right, and together the three stand as a veritable cosmos as Smiley makes brilliant use of the literary trilogy. The ideal form for encompassing the breadth and depth of our brash, glorious, flawed, precious country, it has inspired many significant American writers. A nation violently riven by the Civil War catalyzed Louisa May Alcott's New Englandset March trilogy: Little Women, Little Men, Jo's Boys. Booth Tarkington follows several generations of a midwestern family in the Growth trilogy: The Turmoil, The Magnificent Ambersons, National Avenue. Theodore Dreiser's Trilogy of DesireThe Financier, The Titan, The Stoicfeatures Frank Cowperwood, a fictional version of a real-life Chicago streetcar tycoon. E. L. Doctorow described John Dos Passos' 1930s U.S.A. trilogyThe 42nd Parallel, 1919, The Big Moneyas vaultingly ambitious. Louis Terkel became Studs thanks to James T. Farrell's Studs Lonigan trilogy: Young Lonigan, The...

      • premium: True
      • source: Library Journal
      • content:

        September 15, 2015

        Centering on the strained relationships and dissolved marriages of the children of family pillar Frank Langdon, this final volume in Smiley's "Last Hundred Years" trilogy, (after Some Luck and Early Warning) follows Richie's volatile political career in Washington, DC; Michael's reckless financial scams in New York; and Janet in California, slowly growing distant from her family. This time, the years span 1987 to 2019, with the family farm in Iowa falling victim to foreclosure and Smiley predicting the Langdons' reactions to political events in the years to come. Spotlighted are the intricate relationships among cousins, whose stories weave in and out while moving between California and New York, and Chicago and Washington, DC. The appearance and departure of the surprise family member, Charlie, feels abrupt, as if placed there to add additional drama to an already detailed work. Smiley is most successful in relaying historical fiction; chapters set in the future often seem extraneous. Yet the boon of Smiley's writing is her unforgettable characters and unexpected relationships, such as the bond between siblings Henry and Claire in their later years and the friendship between cousins Emily and Chase, even as their parents remain estranged. VERDICT A fitting conclusion to the trilogy, leaving readers wondering what the future holds in store for the once united but now far-flung family. [See Prepub Alert, 4/6/15.]--Stephanie Sendaula, Library Journal

        Copyright 2015 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

      • premium: True
      • source: Library Journal
      • content:

        May 1, 2015

        Smiley wraps up her "Last Hundred Years" trilogy, begun last year with Some Luck and continuing with this spring's Early Warning, as she arcs through the history of America in the 20th century and beyond (the book ends in 2019) by unfolding the story of the Langdon family. The narrative opens in 1987, as Frank's twin sons show their competitive edge on Wall Street and in politics, and moves on to 9/11, witnessed by Charlie, a surprise character encountered in the second book. Sadly, the family homestead in Iowa is heading for collapse.

        Copyright 2015 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

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From the winner of the Pulitzer Prize: the much-anticipated final volume, following Some Luck and Early Warning, of her acclaimed American trilogy--a richly absorbing new novel that brings the remarkable Langdon family into our present times and beyond

A lot can happen in one hundred years, as Jane Smiley shows to dazzling effect in her Last Hundred Years trilogy. But as Golden Age, its final installment, opens in 1987, the next generation of Langdons face economic, social, political--and personal--challenges unlike anything their ancestors have encountered before.

Michael and Richie, the rivalrous twin sons of World War II hero Frank, work in the high-stakes world of government and finance in Washington and New York, but they soon realize that one's fiercest enemies can be closest to home; Charlie, the charming, recently found scion, struggles with whether he wishes to make a mark on the world; and Guthrie, once...

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