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First class: the legacy of Dunbar, America's first Black public high school
(eBook)

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Published:
[United States] : Chicago Review Press, 2013.
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1 online resource
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Combining a fascinating history of the first U.S. high school for African Americans with an unflinching analysis of urban public-school education today, First Class explores an underrepresented and largely unknown aspect of black history while opening a discussion on what it takes to make a public school successful. In 1870, in the wake of the Civil War, citizens of Washington, DC, opened the Preparatory High School for Colored Youth, the first black public high school in the United States; it would later be renamed Dunbar High and would flourish despite Jim Crow laws and segregation. Dunbar attracted an extraordinary faculty: its early principal was the first black graduate of Harvard, and at a time, it had seven teachers with PhDs, a medical doctor, and a lawyer. During the school's first 80 years, these teachers would develop generations of highly educated, successful African Americans, and at its height in the 1940s and 50s, Dunbar High School sent 80 percent of its students to college. Today, as in too many failing urban public schools, the majority of Dunbar students are barely proficient in reading and math. Journalist and author Alison Stewart whose parents were both Dunbar graduates tells the story of the schools rise, fall, and possible resurgence as it looks to reopen its new, state-of-the-art campus in the fall of 2013.

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Format:
eBook
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781613740125 (electronic bk.), 1613740123 (electronic bk.)

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Description
Combining a fascinating history of the first U.S. high school for African Americans with an unflinching analysis of urban public-school education today, First Class explores an underrepresented and largely unknown aspect of black history while opening a discussion on what it takes to make a public school successful. In 1870, in the wake of the Civil War, citizens of Washington, DC, opened the Preparatory High School for Colored Youth, the first black public high school in the United States; it would later be renamed Dunbar High and would flourish despite Jim Crow laws and segregation. Dunbar attracted an extraordinary faculty: its early principal was the first black graduate of Harvard, and at a time, it had seven teachers with PhDs, a medical doctor, and a lawyer. During the school's first 80 years, these teachers would develop generations of highly educated, successful African Americans, and at its height in the 1940s and 50s, Dunbar High School sent 80 percent of its students to college. Today, as in too many failing urban public schools, the majority of Dunbar students are barely proficient in reading and math. Journalist and author Alison Stewart whose parents were both Dunbar graduates tells the story of the schools rise, fall, and possible resurgence as it looks to reopen its new, state-of-the-art campus in the fall of 2013.
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Mode of access: World Wide Web.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Stewart, A. (2013). First class: the legacy of Dunbar, America's first Black public high school. [United States]: Chicago Review Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Stewart, Alison, 1966-. 2013. First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America's First Black Public High School. [United States]: Chicago Review Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Stewart, Alison, 1966-, First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America's First Black Public High School. [United States]: Chicago Review Press, 2013.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Stewart, Alison. First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America's First Black Public High School. [United States]: Chicago Review Press, 2013. Web.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Record Information

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