Curbside pickup and returns now available at 26 locations. View updated hours of operations here.

The original black elite: Daniel Murray and the story of a forgotten era
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Published:
New York, NY : Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2017].
Physical Desc:
[viii], 498 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits, maps, plans, genealogical table ; 24 cm
Status:
Central
973.0496 T239 2017
Martin Luther King, Jr. African American Collection
973.0496 T239 2017
Description

In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era--embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.'s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress--at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks--Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays' social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges--Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful--often murderous--acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.

Also in This Series
Copies
Location
Call Number
Status
Central
973.0496 T239 2017
On Shelf
Martin Luther King, Jr. African American Collection
973.0496 T239 2017
On Shelf
More Like This
Other Editions and Formats
More Copies In LINK+
Loading LINK+ Copies...
More Details
Format:
Book
Edition:
First edition.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780062346094, 0062346091

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages [421]-464) and index.
Description
In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era--embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.'s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress--at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks--Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays' social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges--Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful--often murderous--acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.
Reviews from GoodReads
Loading GoodReads Reviews.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Taylor, E. D. (2017). The original black elite: Daniel Murray and the story of a forgotten era. First edition. New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Taylor, Elizabeth Dowling. 2017. The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era. New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Taylor, Elizabeth Dowling, The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era. New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2017.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Taylor, Elizabeth Dowling. The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the Story of a Forgotten Era. First edition. New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2017. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Staff View
Grouped Work ID:
7620b3d5-8a6e-8988-4325-ac2d9839d69e
Go To GroupedWork

Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeSep 28, 2021 10:17:15 AM
Last File Modification TimeSep 28, 2021 10:18:24 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeOct 20, 2021 02:08:38 AM

MARC Record

LEADER04391nam 2200493Ii 4500
001sky285336415
003SKY
00520170329123240.0
008170130s2017    nyuabcfg b    001 0beng d
020 |a 9780062346094
020 |a 0062346091
040 |a HRF|b eng|e rda|c HRF
043 |a n-us---
049 |a JRSA
05004|a E185.97|b .M93T39 2017
099 |a 973.0496 T239 2017
1001 |a Taylor, Elizabeth Dowling,|e author.
24514|a The original black elite :|b Daniel Murray and the story of a forgotten era /|c Elizabeth Dowling Taylor.
250 |a First edition.
264 1|a New York, NY :|b Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers,|c [2017]
264 4|c ©2017.
300 |a [viii], 498 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates :|b illustrations, portraits, maps, plans, genealogical table ;|c 24 cm
336 |a text|b txt|2 rdacontent.
337 |a unmediated|b n|2 rdamedia.
338 |a volume|b nc|2 rdacarrier.
504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages [421]-464) and index.
5050 |a Up and coming -- The good wife -- The Black elite -- The good life -- The good citizen -- Activist couple -- Backsliding -- Confronting lost ground -- National Afro-American Council -- Black history pioneer -- Courting controversy -- Struggling -- Father and sons -- Disillusioned -- Life's work -- Ironic fruits -- New negro/Old cit.
520 |a In this outstanding cultural biography, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Slave in the White House chronicles a critical yet overlooked chapter in American history: the inspiring rise and calculated fall of the black elite, from Emancipation through Reconstruction to the Jim Crow Era--embodied in the experiences of an influential figure of the time, academic, entrepreneur, and political activist and black history pioneer Daniel Murray. In the wake of the Civil War, Daniel Murray, born free and educated in Baltimore, was in the vanguard of Washington, D.C.'s black upper class. Appointed Assistant Librarian at the Library of Congress--at a time when government appointments were the most prestigious positions available for blacks--Murray became wealthy through his business as a construction contractor and married a college-educated socialite. The Murrays' social circles included some of the first African-American U.S. Senators and Congressmen, and their children went to the best colleges--Harvard and Cornell. Though Murray and other black elite of his time were primed to assimilate into the cultural fabric as Americans first and people of color second, their prospects were crushed by Jim Crow segregation and the capitulation to white supremacist groups by the government, which turned a blind eye to their unlawful--often murderous--acts. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor traces the rise, fall, and disillusionment of upper-class African Americans, revealing that they were a representation not of hypothetical achievement but what could be realized by African Americans through education and equal opportunities. As she makes clear, these well-educated and wealthy elite were living proof that African Americans did not lack ability to fully participate in the social contract as white supremacists claimed, making their subsequent fall when Reconstruction was prematurely abandoned all the more tragic. Illuminating and powerful, her magnificent work brings to life a dark chapter of American history that too many Americans have yet to recognize.
60010|a Murray, Daniel Alexander Payne,|d 1852-1925.
61020|a National Afro-American Council.
650 0|a African American librarians|v Biography.
650 0|a African American intellectuals|x History|y 19th century.
650 0|a African American intellectuals|x History|y 20th century.
650 0|a Upper class African Americans|x History|y 19th century.
650 0|a Upper class African Americans|x History|y 20th century.
650 0|a African American leadership|x History.
650 0|a African Americans|x Social life and customs.
650 0|a African Americans|x History|y 1877-1964.
651 0|a United States|x Race relations|x History.
655 7|a Biographies.|2 lcgft
907 |a .b24740883
945 |y .i75464974|i 33029102396272|l cenag|s -|k |u 12|x 2|w 1|v 23|t 3|z 03-02-17|o -
945 |y .i7567970x|i 33029102499159|l kinaa|s -|k |u 10|x 2|w 0|v 13|t 3|z 04-12-17|o -
998 |e -|d a |f eng|a cen|a kin