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Play anything: the pleasure of limits, the uses of boredom, and the secret of games
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Author:
Published:
New York : Basic Books, [2016].
Physical Desc:
xii, 266 pages ; 25 cm.
Status:
Central
306.48 B675 2016
South Natomas
306.48 B675 2016
Sylvan Oaks
306.48 B675 2016
Description

"The gold standard of our culture is 'fun.' Companies want their offices to feel more playful, schools want learning to be entertaining, programmers want their products to feel as intuitive and addictive as playing Tetris or AngryBirds. Trying to make life like playing a game sounds like a good idea--who doesn't want to have fun while working or commuting, parenting or cleaning?--but what's often overlooked in the rush to make everything 'fun' is that games are hard. Playing a sport requires concentration, repetition, and physical pain; playing a musical instrument demands shockingly boring practice and patience; even playing video games requires hours and hours of study, determination, and drive. Making our ideas about 'play' sound a whole lot like 'work.' Where's the fun in that? In Play Anything, Ian Bogost--the Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology--shows that our common understanding of games--that they are always fun, and always juvenile--is dead wrong. And that that's a good thing, both for how we play and how we conduct our days"--

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Status
Central
306.48 B675 2016
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South Natomas
306.48 B675 2016
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Sylvan Oaks
306.48 B675 2016
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Format:
Book
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780465051724

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-250) and index.
Description
"The gold standard of our culture is 'fun.' Companies want their offices to feel more playful, schools want learning to be entertaining, programmers want their products to feel as intuitive and addictive as playing Tetris or AngryBirds. Trying to make life like playing a game sounds like a good idea--who doesn't want to have fun while working or commuting, parenting or cleaning?--but what's often overlooked in the rush to make everything 'fun' is that games are hard. Playing a sport requires concentration, repetition, and physical pain; playing a musical instrument demands shockingly boring practice and patience; even playing video games requires hours and hours of study, determination, and drive. Making our ideas about 'play' sound a whole lot like 'work.' Where's the fun in that? In Play Anything, Ian Bogost--the Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and Professor of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology--shows that our common understanding of games--that they are always fun, and always juvenile--is dead wrong. And that that's a good thing, both for how we play and how we conduct our days"--,Provided by publisher.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Bogost, I. (2016). Play anything: the pleasure of limits, the uses of boredom, and the secret of games. New York: Basic Books.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Bogost, Ian. 2016. Play Anything: The Pleasure of Limits, the Uses of Boredom, and the Secret of Games. New York: Basic Books.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Bogost, Ian, Play Anything: The Pleasure of Limits, the Uses of Boredom, and the Secret of Games. New York: Basic Books, 2016.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Bogost, Ian. Play Anything: The Pleasure of Limits, the Uses of Boredom, and the Secret of Games. New York: Basic Books, 2016. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
fa87f30f-1080-98cc-05f1-6901b1ae6eb4
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeJun 30, 2022 06:10:14 PM
Last File Modification TimeJul 01, 2022 03:23:52 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJul 02, 2022 02:10:20 AM

MARC Record

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5058 |a Machine generated contents note: Preface: Life is Not a Game -- 1. Everywhere, Playgrounds -- 2. Ironoia, the Mistrust of Things -- 3. Fun Isn't Pleasure, It's Novelty -- 4. Play Is in Things, Not in You -- 5. From Restraint to Constraint -- 6. The Pleasure of Limits -- 7. The Opposite of Happiness -- Conclusion: Living with Things.
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