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Homintern: how gay culture liberated the modern world
(Book)

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Published:
New Haven : Yale University Press, [2016].
Physical Desc:
xv, 421 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Status:
Central
306.766 W894 2016
Description

"In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents, languages, and almost a century, Gregory Woods identifies the ways in which homosexuality has helped shape Western culture. Extending from the trials of Oscar Wilde to the gay liberation era, this book examines a period in which increased visibility made acceptance of homosexuality one of the measures of modernity. Woods shines a revealing light on the diverse, informal networks of gay people in the arts and other creative fields. Uneasily called "the Homintern" (an echo of Lenin's "Comintern") by those suspicious of an international homosexual conspiracy, such networks connected gay writers, actors, artists, musicians, dancers, filmmakers, politicians, and spies. While providing some defense against dominant heterosexual exclusion, the grouping brought solidarity, celebrated talent, and, in doing so, invigorated the majority culture. Woods introduces an enormous cast of gifted and extraordinary characters, most of them operating with surprising openness; but also explores such issues as artistic influence, the coping strategies of minorities, the hypocrisies of conservatism, and the effects of positive and negative discrimination. Traveling from Harlem in the 1910s to 1920s Paris, 1930s Berlin, 1950s New York and beyond, this sharply observed, warm-spirited book presents a surpassing portrait of twentieth-century gay culture and the men and women who both redefined themselves and changed history"--

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306.766 W894 2016
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Format:
Book
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780300218039

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 380-401) and index.
Description
"In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents, languages, and almost a century, Gregory Woods identifies the ways in which homosexuality has helped shape Western culture. Extending from the trials of Oscar Wilde to the gay liberation era, this book examines a period in which increased visibility made acceptance of homosexuality one of the measures of modernity. Woods shines a revealing light on the diverse, informal networks of gay people in the arts and other creative fields. Uneasily called "the Homintern" (an echo of Lenin's "Comintern") by those suspicious of an international homosexual conspiracy, such networks connected gay writers, actors, artists, musicians, dancers, filmmakers, politicians, and spies. While providing some defense against dominant heterosexual exclusion, the grouping brought solidarity, celebrated talent, and, in doing so, invigorated the majority culture. Woods introduces an enormous cast of gifted and extraordinary characters, most of them operating with surprising openness; but also explores such issues as artistic influence, the coping strategies of minorities, the hypocrisies of conservatism, and the effects of positive and negative discrimination. Traveling from Harlem in the 1910s to 1920s Paris, 1930s Berlin, 1950s New York and beyond, this sharply observed, warm-spirited book presents a surpassing portrait of twentieth-century gay culture and the men and women who both redefined themselves and changed history"--,Provided by publisher.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Woods, G. (2016). Homintern: how gay culture liberated the modern world. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Woods, Gregory, 1953-. 2016. Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Woods, Gregory, 1953-, Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Woods, Gregory. Homintern: How Gay Culture Liberated the Modern World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
8c5b8b5b-cfc0-4bb3-a4ec-bfc1b306998f
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeJul 29, 2020 04:57:41 PM
Last File Modification TimeSep 01, 2020 10:52:23 PM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeOct 23, 2020 02:39:32 AM

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