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The new evolution diet: what our paleolithic ancestors can teach us about weight loss, fitness, and aging
(Book)

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Published:
New York : Rodale : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan, c2011.
Physical Desc:
viii, 213 pages : ill. ; 24 cm.
Status:
Central
613.25 D488 2011
Sacramento Public Library
613.25 D488 2011
Description
Believe it or not, our DNA is almost exactly the same as that of our ancestors. While scientific advances in agriculture, medicine, and technology have protected man, to some degree, from dangers such as starvation, illness, and exposure, the fact remains that our cave-dwelling cousins were considerably healthier than we are. Our paleolithic ancestors did not suffer from heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity. In fact, a good deal of what we view as normal aging is a modern condition that is more akin to disease than any natural state of growing older.Our predecessors were incomparably better nourished than we are, and were incredibly physically fit. And certainly none of them ever craved a doughnut, let alone tasted one. In fact, the human preference for sweet tastes and fatty textures was developed in an environment where such treats were rare, and signaled dense, useful energy. This once-helpful adaptation is the downfall of many a dieter today. It's what makes it hard to resist fats and sweets, especially when they are all around us.We are not living as we were built to live. Our genes were forged in an environment where activity was mandatory—you were active or you starved or were eaten. This created strong selective pressure for genes encoding a smart, physically adept individual capable of very high activity levels. Humans are among the most active of species, and we carry energetically expensive brains to boot. Our energy expenditures rank high among all animals. At least they once did. The New Evolution Diet by Arthur De Vany, PhD is a roadmap back to the better health our ancestors once enjoyed. By eliminating modern foods, including carbohydrates, dairy, and all processed foods from our diets, we can undo much of the damage caused by our modern food environment. The plan is based on three simple principles:1. Enjoy the pleasure of food and do not count or restrict calories. Eat three satisfying meals a day filled with non-starchy vegetables, fruits, and high-quality, lean proteins2. Do not starve yourself, but do go hungry episodically, for brief periods, to promote a low fasting blood insulin level and increase metabolic fat-burning. 3. Exercise less, not more, but with more playfulness and intensity. The goal is to create a strong body with a high resting metabolism and a large physiologic capacity to move through life easily—not to burn calories.
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Central
613.25 D488 2011
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Sacramento Public Library
613.25 D488 2011
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Format:
Book
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781605291833, 1605291838

Notes

Bibliography
Includes index and bibliographical references.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

De Vany, A. (2011). The new evolution diet: what our paleolithic ancestors can teach us about weight loss, fitness, and aging. New York: Rodale : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

De Vany, Arthur. 2011. The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us About Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging. New York: Rodale : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

De Vany, Arthur, The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us About Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging. New York: Rodale : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan, 2011.

MLA Citation (style guide)

De Vany, Arthur. The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us About Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging. New York: Rodale : Distributed to the trade by Macmillan, 2011. Print.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
03892b31-e9a6-1e10-3ca9-d4bd652314f0
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeOct 21, 2020 09:45:36 AM
Sierra Extract Marked Suppressed/Deleted DateOct 21, 2020
Last File Modification TimeOct 21, 2020 09:49:56 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeNov 23, 2020 05:39:21 AM

MARC Record

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