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New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America
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Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History
A New York Times Notable Book
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Selection
A Providence Journal Best Book of the Year
Winner of the Organization of American Historians Merle Curti Award for Social History
Finalist for the Harriet Tubman Prize
Finalist for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize


"This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." —David W. Blight, author of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom


Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize


Widely hailed as a "powerfully written" history about America's beginnings (Annette Gordon-Reed), New England Bound fundamentally changes the story of America's seventeenth-century origins. Building on the works of giants like Bernard Bailyn and Edmund S. Morgan, Wendy Warren has not only "mastered that scholarship" but has now rendered it in "an original way, and deepened the story" (New York Times Book Review). While earlier histories of slavery largely confine themselves to the South, Warren's "panoptical exploration" (Christian Science Monitor) links the growth of the northern colonies to the slave trade and examines the complicity of New England's leading families, demonstrating how the region's economy derived its vitality from the slave trading ships coursing through its ports.


And even while New England Bound explains the way in which the Atlantic slave trade drove the colonization of New England, it also brings to light, in many cases for the first time ever, the lives of the thousands of reluctant Indian and African slaves who found themselves forced into the project of building that city on a hill. We encounter enslaved Africans working side jobs as con artists, enslaved Indians who protested their banishment to sugar islands, enslaved Africans who set fire to their owners' homes and goods, and enslaved Africans who saved their owners' lives. In Warren's meticulous, compelling, and hard-won recovery of such forgotten lives, the true variety of chattel slavery in the Americas comes to light, and New England Bound becomes the new standard for understanding colonial America.

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Street Date:
06/07/2016
Language:
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ISBN:
9781631492150
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B01693MBLC
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APA Citation (style guide)

Wendy Warren. (2016). New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. Liveright.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Wendy Warren. 2016. New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. Liveright.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Wendy Warren, New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. Liveright, 2016.

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Wendy Warren. New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. Liveright, 2016. Web.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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shortDescription

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History
A New York Times Notable Book
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Selection
A Providence Journal Best Book of the Year
Winner of the Organization of American Historians Merle Curti Award for Social History
Finalist for the Harriet Tubman Prize
Finalist for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize

"This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." —David W. Blight, author of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize

Widely hailed as a "powerfully written" history about America's beginnings (Annette Gordon-Reed), New England Bound fundamentally changes the story of America's seventeenth-century origins. Building on the works of giants like Bernard Bailyn and Edmund S. Morgan, Wendy Warren has not only "mastered that...

isOwnedByCollections
True
title
New England Bound
fullDescription

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History
A New York Times Notable Book
A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Selection
A Providence Journal Best Book of the Year
Winner of the Organization of American Historians Merle Curti Award for Social History
Finalist for the Harriet Tubman Prize
Finalist for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize

"This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." —David W. Blight, author of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize

Widely hailed as a "powerfully written" history about America's beginnings (Annette Gordon-Reed), New England Bound fundamentally changes the story of America's seventeenth-century origins. Building on the works of giants like Bernard Bailyn and Edmund S. Morgan, Wendy Warren has not only "mastered that scholarship" but has now rendered it in "an original way, and deepened the story" (New York Times Book Review). While earlier histories of slavery largely confine themselves to the South, Warren's "panoptical exploration" (Christian Science Monitor) links the growth of the northern colonies to the slave trade and examines the complicity of New England's leading families, demonstrating how the region's economy derived its vitality from the slave trading ships coursing through its ports.

And even while New England Bound explains the way in which the Atlantic slave trade drove the colonization of New England, it also brings to light, in many cases for the first time ever, the lives of the thousands of reluctant Indian and African slaves who found themselves forced into the project of building that city on a hill. We encounter enslaved Africans working side jobs as con artists, enslaved Indians who protested their banishment to sugar islands, enslaved Africans who set fire to their owners' homes and goods, and enslaved Africans who saved their owners' lives. In Warren's meticulous, compelling, and hard-won recovery of such forgotten lives, the true variety of chattel slavery in the Americas comes to light, and New England Bound becomes the new standard for understanding colonial America.

sortTitle
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crossRefId
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reviews
      • premium: False
      • source: Christopher L. Brown;New York Times Book Review
      • content: [Warren] builds on and generously acknowledges more than two generations of research into the social history of New England and the economic history of the Atlantic world. But not only has she mastered that scholarship, she has also brought it together in an original way, and deepened the story with fresh research...New England Bound conveys the disorientation, the deprivation, the vulnerability, the occasional hunger and the profound isolation that defined the life of most African exiles in Puritan New England, where there was no plantation community.
      • premium: False
      • source: Jill Lepore, author of New York Burning
      • content: A bracing and fearless inquiry into the intricate web of slavery and empire into which all New Englanders were bound. Ardently argued, and urgently necessary.
      • premium: False
      • source: James Merrell, author of Into the American Woods, winner of the Bancroft Prize
      • content: New England Bound is a book of revelations. Not only does Wendy Warren cast startling new light on early America, not only does she uncover how racial slavery was woven into the fabric of New England from the very beginning, but she also shows how forgotten folk—people long thought lost to history—can be brought to light, and to life, if we look, and listen, for their stories. A remarkable achievement.
      • premium: False
      • source: John Demos, author of The Heathen School
      • content: A major contribution to the history of enslavement, of African Americans, of early New England society, and—most important—of the sinews and tissues at the center of the whole complex process we call 'colonization.' The research that supports it is ingenious, the argument compelling, the prose lucid and graceful.
      • premium: False
      • source: David W. Blight, Yale University, author of Race and Reunion
      • content: With intrepid research and stunning narrative skill, Wendy Warren demonstrates how much seventeenth-century New England societies were dependent on the West Indian slave trade, and especially on the labor, bodies, and lives of black slaves. Warren has turned the prophetic lessons of Ecclesiastes back upon the Puritan fathers with scholarly judgment, humanizing both them and the people they enslaved. This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser.
      • premium: False
      • source: Maya Jasanoff;New York Review of Books
      • content: 'Slavery was in England's American colonies, even its New England colonies, from the very beginning,' explains Princeton historian Wendy Warren in her deeply thoughtful, elegantly written New England Bound....The greatest revelations of New England Bound lie in Warren's meticulous reconstruction of slavery in colonial New England....Warren pores over the patchy archival record with a probing eye and an ear keen to silences.
      • premium: False
      • source: Annette Gordon-Reed, author of The Hemingses of Monticello, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
      • content: Wendy Warren's deeply researched and powerfully written New England Bound opens up a new vista for the study of slavery and race in the United States. It will transform our thinking about seventeenth-century New England.
      • premium: False
      • source: Joyce Appleby, author of The Relentless Revolution
      • content: In New England Bound, Wendy Warren builds a powerful case for the centrality of slavery to the economy of the Puritan colonies in the North.
      • premium: False
      • source: The New Yorker
      • content: Whereas most studies of slavery in the United States concern the antebellum South, this one stakes out less visited territory—the laws and decisions made by the colonists in New England two centuries earlier.
      • premium: False
      • source: Kenneth J. Cooper;Boston Globe
      • content: [Warren] widens the lens to show the early New England economy was enmeshed in the seafaring trade that developed between four Atlantic continents for the transport, clothing, and feeding of African captives. The region's early growth and prosperity, Warren shows, sprang from that tainted commerce. . . . Southerners resentful of Northerners' condescension about the slaveholding past may find some comfort in these pages. In them should be some Northern discomfort too.
      • premium: False
      • source: Peter Lewis;Christian Science Monitor
      • content: Historians have written penetratingly on North American colonial racism and slavery—Edmund Morgan, Alden Vaughan, Ira Berlin, for starters—but New England Bound is a smart contribution to the New England story, a panoptical exploration of how slavery took root like a weed in the crack of a sidewalk. . . . What we have in this account is sharp explication of the 'deadly symbiosis' of colonization and slavery, written with a governed verve that perks like a...
      • premium: True
      • source: Publisher's Weekly
      • content:

        March 14, 2016
        Countering the historiography of colonial New England that’s focused on Puritans and Native Americans, Warren, an assistant professor of history at Princeton, elegantly makes clear how “the shadow of an Atlantic slave trade darkened even the earliest interactions between Europeans and Indians in New England.” Readers familiar with the Salem witch trials will recognize the figure of Tituba, the Carib Indian slave of the community’s minister and the alleged instigator of the rituals that sparked the hysteria; Warren reveals that enslaved Africans were far from anomalous in these colonies, having arrived as early as 1638. Leading New England merchants, many of whom had close ties of kinship and business with the English plantation colonies in the West Indies, were heavily invested in the transatlantic trade in humans. Even less elite residents of these colonies—including sailors, artisans, and farmwives—were aware of and profited, directly or indirectly, from the presence of slaves in their communities. By describing the lived experiences of these slaves, Warren adds a new and surprising dimension to the oft-told story of the New England colonies—one that offers much-needed revision and complication of the simple and comforting myths of intercultural friendship and virtuous endeavor. Illus.

      • premium: True
      • source: Kirkus
      • content:

        April 15, 2016
        A history of the strong beginnings of American slavery in the 17th century.Many of us think of slavery in America as an aspect of the 19th-century Deep South, but Warren (History/Princeton Univ.) astutely shows how New Englanders were quick to join in the buying and selling of both Indian and African slaves. In fact, slavery was an intrinsic part of their economy, unifying the Atlantic world through goods and services bought with earnings off slaves and slave-made products. In 1641, the Massachusetts Body of Liberties formed the basis for slave codes, banning bond-slavery with the exception of "lawful captives taken in just wars." The Massachusetts Bay Colony and other entities exported Indians taken in local wars and imported Africans for whom wars were waged abroad. Indians were unsatisfactory slaves as they were rebellious and prone to escape or suicide. Consequently, Indians were "dumped" in the West Indies in exchange for sugar, tobacco, and African slaves. While some have said New England was key to the Indies economy, which relied on the food and cattle sent along with slaves, the author points out that the colonists were dependent on the profits from property and markets in the Indies. Warren analyzes a wealth of 17th-century correspondence, journals, court records, wills, and other documents, and she has maintained original spelling and grammar in order to save the sense of that world. It certainly accomplishes that, but it may slow some readers trying to understand the context, and Warren occasionally gets bogged down in examples of legal documents, particularly in long lists of wills, revealing estates that included a few slaves. New England slavery was not the same as plantation slavery, where slaves were worked to death for a single crop. Rather, most were sold into domestic servitude, often as a single slave with no community. For students of early American history, this is an eye-opening book about Puritans and Anglicans who disapproved of slavery but accepted it as a normal part of life and reaped its profits.

        COPYRIGHT(2016) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

      • premium: True
      • source: Booklist
      • content:

        May 15, 2016
        Most surveys of our peculiar institution of chattel slavery concentrate upon the antebellum South. Warren, an assistant professor of history at Princeton, asserts that both slavery and the slave trade were national in scope and were a fundamental part of the economic and social fabric of the New England colonies, especially in the seventeenth century. To support her thesis, Warren marshals some impressive facts. Even before the large-scale importation of African slaves into Southern colonies, Native Americans were being enslaved in New England, and African slaves were sent to the North by way of the West Indies. Ships built in New England transported enslaved Africans across the Atlantic, and the economy of the Northern colonies quickly became tied to the developing slave-based economy of the Southern colonies. Unfortunately, Warren makes some sweeping and highly questionable assertions. For example, despite her confident claim, colonization of the Americas did not make slavery inevitable, any more than other mass migrations have. Still, this is a valuable work that reminds us that the curse of slavery cast a very broad net.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2016, American Library Association.)

      • premium: True
      • source: Library Journal
      • content:

        June 1, 2016

        For too long slavery has been exclusively identified with the American South. Long forgotten has been New England's complex relationship with the institution. Beginning in the mid-17th century, New England invested liberally in the slave trade and depended extensively on slave labor, both African and Native American, to create the prosperity that came to fruition in the 18th century. Although similar in the South, slavery in New England differed in some essential elements. Enslaved labor was largely invisible because slave work was indistinguishable from the free labor of their English counterparts, and slaves comprised a small percentage of New England's population. The Puritans were able to build significant wealth through their trading in human chattel. Warren (history, Princeton Univ.) demonstrates that New England merchants successfully integrated their enterprises into the Atlantic trading economy of the 17th century, buying and selling laborers on plantations in the West Indies. It was on the sugar plantations on island colonies where great hardships were endured while working in the hazardous enterprise of sugar production. VERDICT A much-needed correction in the perception of slavery, this work will be enjoyed by those interested in the history of colonial North America and the transatlantic world. [See Prepub Alert, 3/23/16.]--Glen Edward Taul, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY

        Copyright 2016 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

      • premium: True
      • source: Library Journal
      • content:

        January 1, 2016

        A winner of major awards from Yale while she studied there for her PhD and now a tenure-track professor at Princeton, Warren figures among the historians (e.g., Sean Wilentz, Annette Gordon Reed, Maya Jasonoff, and Jill Lepore) who have compelled us to rethink our country's beginnings. Here she shifts the focus on slavery northward, clarifying how the slave trade benefited the Northern colonies, as slave ships anchored at New England ports and prominent families such as the Winthrops profited from their slave-trade investments.

        Copyright 2016 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

awards
      • source: Columbia University
      • value: Pulitzer Prize Finalist
subtitle
Slavery and Colonization in Early America
popularity
160
publisher
Liveright
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