Curbside pickup and returns now available at 26 locations. View updated hours of operations here.

100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
(Adobe EPUB eBook, Kindle Book, OverDrive Read)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Author:
Published:
Picador 2016
Status:
Checked Out
Description

A fascinating tour through the evolution of the human diet, and how we can improve our health by understanding our complicated history with food.

There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods—and on and on. In 100 Million Years of Food biological anthropologist Stephen Le explains how cuisines of different cultures are a result of centuries of evolution, finely tuned to our biology and surroundings. Today many cultures have strayed from their ancestral diets, relying instead on mass-produced food often made with chemicals that may be contributing to a rise in so-called "Western diseases," such as cancer, heart disease, and obesity.

Travelling around the world to places as far-flung as Vietnam, Kenya, India, and the US, Stephen Le introduces us to people who are growing, cooking, and eating food using both traditional and modern methods, striving for a sustainable, healthy diet. In clear, compelling arguments based on scientific research, Le contends that our ancestral diets provide the best first line of defense in protecting our health and providing a balanced diet. Fast-food diets, as well as strict regimens like paleo or vegan, in effect highjack our biology and ignore the complex nature of our bodies. In 100 Million Years of Food Le takes us on a guided tour of evolution, demonstrating how our diets are the result of millions of years of history, and how we can return to a sustainable, healthier way of eating.

Also in This Series
Formats
Adobe EPUB eBook
Works on all eReaders (except Kindles), desktop computers and mobile devices with with reading apps installed.
Kindle Book
Works on Kindles and devices with a Kindle app installed.
Need Help?
If you are having problem transferring a title to your device, please fill out this support form or visit the library so we can help you to use our eBooks and eAudio Books.
More Like This
Other Editions and Formats
More Copies In LINK+
Loading LINK+ Copies...
More Details
Format:
Adobe EPUB eBook, Kindle Book, OverDrive Read
Street Date:
02/02/2016
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781250050427
ASIN:
B00V3ABSVG
Reviews from GoodReads
Loading GoodReads Reviews.
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Stephen Le. (2016). 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today. Picador.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Stephen Le. 2016. 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today. Picador.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Stephen Le, 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today. Picador, 2016.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Stephen Le. 100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today. Picador, 2016. Web.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Copy Details
LibraryOwnedAvailable
10

There is 1 hold on this title.

Staff View
Grouped Work ID:
e6f24b5f-a5a1-6647-af7f-6982a4094279
Go To Grouped Work
Needs Update?:
No
Date Added:
Jun 12, 2018 16:58:35
Date Updated:
Oct 25, 2020 02:52:11
Last Metadata Check:
Oct 25, 2020 07:35:48
Last Metadata Change:
Jun 20, 2020 17:38:39
Last Availability Check:
Oct 25, 2020 07:35:51
Last Availability Change:
Oct 07, 2020 10:51:38
Last Grouped Work Modification Time:
Oct 26, 2020 02:27:19

OverDrive Product Record

images
    • cover:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-100/2390-1/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img100.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • thumbnail:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-200/2390-1/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img200.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • cover150Wide:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-150/2390-1/6D7/881/AF/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img150.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • cover300Wide:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-400/2390-1/6D7/881/AF/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img400.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
formats
      • identifiers:
            • type: ISBN
            • value: 9781250050427
      • name: Adobe EPUB eBook
      • id: ebook-epub-adobe
      • identifiers:
            • type: ASIN
            • value: B00V3ABSVG
      • name: Kindle Book
      • id: ebook-kindle
      • identifiers:
            • type: ISBN
            • value: 9781250050427
      • name: OverDrive Read
      • id: ebook-overdrive
mediaType
eBook
primaryCreator
    • role: Author
    • name: Stephen Le
title
100 Million Years of Food
dateAdded
2016-04-07T17:05:11.98-04:00
contentDetails
      • href: https://link.overdrive.com/?websiteID=141&titleID=2174294
      • type: text/html
      • account:
          • name: Sacramento Public Library (CA)
          • id: 1151
sortTitle
100 Million Years of Food What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
crossRefId
2174294
subtitle
What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
id
6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1
starRating
3.7

OverDrive MetaData

isPublicDomain
False
images
    • cover:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-100/2390-1/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img100.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • thumbnail:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-200/2390-1/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img200.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • cover150Wide:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-150/2390-1/6D7/881/AF/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img150.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
    • cover300Wide:
        • href: https://img1.od-cdn.com/ImageType-400/2390-1/6D7/881/AF/{6D7881AF-A693-457A-B9E4-0C45760D90C1}Img400.jpg
        • type: image/jpeg
isPublicPerformanceAllowed
False
formats
      • fileName: OneHundredMillionYearsofFoodWhatOurAn9781250050427
      • partCount: 0
      • fileSize: 2873935
      • identifiers:
            • type: ISBN
            • value: 9781250050427
      • rights:
            • type: Copying
            • value: 0
            • type: Printing
            • value: 0
            • type: Lending
            • value: 0
            • type: ReadAloud
            • value: 0
            • type: ExpirationRights
            • value: 0
      • name: Adobe EPUB eBook
      • id: ebook-epub-adobe
      • onSaleDate: 02/02/2016
      • samples:
            • source: From the book
            • formatType: ebook-overdrive
            • url: https://samples.overdrive.com/?crid=6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1&.epub-sample.overdrive.com
      • fileName: OneHundredMillionYearsofFoodWhatOurAn9781250050427
      • partCount: 0
      • fileSize: 0
      • identifiers:
            • type: ASIN
            • value: B00V3ABSVG
      • name: Kindle Book
      • id: ebook-kindle
      • onSaleDate: 02/02/2016
      • samples:
            • source: From the book
            • formatType: ebook-overdrive
            • url: https://samples.overdrive.com/?crid=6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1&.epub-sample.overdrive.com
      • fileName: OneHundredMillionYearsofFoodWhatOurAn9781250050427
      • partCount: 0
      • fileSize: 929882
      • identifiers:
            • type: ISBN
            • value: 9781250050427
      • name: OverDrive Read
      • id: ebook-overdrive
      • onSaleDate: 02/02/2016
      • samples:
            • source: From the book
            • formatType: ebook-overdrive
            • url: https://samples.overdrive.com/?crid=6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1&.epub-sample.overdrive.com
languages
      • code: en
      • name: English
keywords
      • value: Diet & Nutrition / General
creators
      • role: Author
      • fileAs: Le, Stephen
      • bioText: STEPHEN LE earned his doctorate in biological anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he held a prestigious Chancellor's Fellowship. He also holds a master's degree in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and an undergraduate degree in mathematics from the University of Ottawa. He has held grants from the National Science Foundation and the Japan Society for the promotion of science, and his research has appeared in the Journal of Theoretical Biology and Cross-Cultural Research.
      • name: Stephen Le
subjects
      • value: Cooking & Food
      • value: Health & Fitness
      • value: Science
      • value: Nonfiction
publishDate
2016-02-02T00:00:00-05:00
publishDateText
02/02/2016
mediaType
eBook
shortDescription

A fascinating tour through the evolution of the human diet, and how we can improve our health by understanding our complicated history with food.

There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods—and on and on. In One Hundred Million Years of Food biological anthropologist Stephen Le explains how cuisines of different cultures are a result of centuries of evolution, finely tuned to our biology and surroundings. Today many cultures have strayed from their ancestral diets, relying instead on mass-produced food often made with chemicals that may be contributing to a rise in so-called "Western diseases," such as cancer, heart disease, and obesity.

Travelling around the world to places as far-flung as Vietnam, Kenya, India, and the...

isOwnedByCollections
True
title
100 Million Years of Food
fullDescription

A fascinating tour through the evolution of the human diet, and how we can improve our health by understanding our complicated history with food.

There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods—and on and on. In 100 Million Years of Food biological anthropologist Stephen Le explains how cuisines of different cultures are a result of centuries of evolution, finely tuned to our biology and surroundings. Today many cultures have strayed from their ancestral diets, relying instead on mass-produced food often made with chemicals that may be contributing to a rise in so-called "Western diseases," such as cancer, heart disease, and obesity.

Travelling around the world to places as far-flung as Vietnam, Kenya, India, and the US, Stephen Le introduces us to people who are growing, cooking, and eating food using both traditional and modern methods, striving for a sustainable, healthy diet. In clear, compelling arguments based on scientific research, Le contends that our ancestral diets provide the best first line of defense in protecting our health and providing a balanced diet. Fast-food diets, as well as strict regimens like paleo or vegan, in effect highjack our biology and ignore the complex nature of our bodies. In 100 Million Years of Food Le takes us on a guided tour of evolution, demonstrating how our diets are the result of millions of years of history, and how we can return to a sustainable, healthier way of eating.

sortTitle
100 Million Years of Food What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
crossRefId
2174294
reviews
      • premium: True
      • source: Kirkus
      • content:

        November 15, 2015
        A biology professor traverses the globe to explore the evolution of food. In this accessible debut, Le offers a nimble hybrid that is equal parts travel memoir and informed speculation about the biology of human nutrition. The author, with roots in Vietnam and Canada, also explores how different cultures approach food in support of his thesis that straying from one's ancestral diets is a leading cause of modern disease. It's a surprisingly cleareyed approach that demonstrates Le's awareness of trendy diets like the paleo approach while also allowing him to dig into the science behind the effects that eating has on our lives. Starting off in Vietnam to explore the now-exotic inclusion of insects in one's diet, the author traveled the world to explore the history of meat, fish, fruits, and starches in far-flung locales. It's not always pretty--the chapter "A Truce Among Thieves" delves uncomfortably into the weird world of parasites and the drawbacks of modern hygiene on our digestive and immune systems. In an interesting diversion for what is nominally a scientific inquiry, Le doesn't confine what he learns to a restrictive definition for health, as he notes in his chapter on meat. "In other words, the robustness of meat-eaters and the long lives of meat-abstainers are two sides of the same biological coin," he writes. "It all depends on how you define healthy. Does healthy mean being in a great mood and being fertile and stronger at a younger age, or does healthy mean delaying cancer for a couple of years and hanging out with your great-grandchildren?" This line of inquiry continues in the book's penultimate chapter, "The Future of Food," in which Le chronicles his discussions with proponents of different diets and lifestyles, none of whom can agree on a best approach. The book's conclusions about what to eat and drink are common sense, but the journey Le takes to get us there is worth the cover price.

        COPYRIGHT(2015) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

      • premium: True
      • source: Library Journal
      • content:

        December 1, 2015

        Le (biology, Univ. of Ottawa) believes that adverse health conditions have arisen from changes that have made our food unlike what our ancestors ate. He uses an evolutionary biology perspective to chart alterations in dietary practices from primitive times to the present day in an attempt to understand the best type of diet for us to follow. Le begins by investigating specific categories of food, such as insects, fruit, meat, fish, plants, alcohol, and milk. He also postulates on the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the prevalence of food allergies in modern times. Summations of scientific articles are used as evidence throughout, although detailed analysis is lacking. The account is interspersed with anecdotes from Le's travels, in which he meets entrepreneurs and foodies who are passionate about traditional food and sustainability. The book ends with the author's recommendations for eating well, which include consuming the traditional foods one's ancestors enjoyed, sustainable eating, moderate exercise, safe germ and sun exposure, and cooking at low heat. VERDICT An intriguing viewpoint on how dietary practices have changed over time, but further research is needed to support some of Le's healthy living recommendations--Rebekah Kati, Durham, NC

        Copyright 2015 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

      • premium: True
      • source: Booklist
      • content:

        February 1, 2016
        When it comes to food, early humans knew best, according to Le, a biological anthropologist. Modern diets, high in processed white as snow rice and other carbohydrates, increase the risk of diseases of western civilization, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Le travels to and dines in Kenya, Australia, and Vietnam, his parents' birthplace, where he eats a high-protein centipede. He carefully distinguishes between short-term and long-term health benefits of different diets. High-dairy, high-meat diets improve muscle mass and may help elderly people be less frail, but they're also more likely to lead to shorter lives. By contrast, Dean Ornish's low-meat, low-fat diet seems better for longevity but is tricky to sustain. Ideally, people should keep moving, consume less meat and dairy at young ages, and eat like their own ancestors. For example, Inuit children are genetically adapted to be dairy free, so they can wind up with dangerous levels of calcium in their blood (and potential kidney damage) if they switch to North Americanstyle diets. Le mixes advice, personal anecdotes, and medical science in this fascinating food-for-thought narrative.(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 2016, American Library Association.)

subtitle
What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
popularity
102
publisher
Picador
links
    • self:
        • href: https://api.overdrive.com/v1/collections/v1L1BWwAAAA2I/products/6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1/metadata
        • type: application/vnd.overdrive.api+json
id
6d7881af-a693-457a-b9e4-0c45760d90c1
starRating
3.7