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The vanishing face of Gaia: a final warning
(eAudiobook)

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Published:
[United States] : Post Hypnotic Press, 2011.
Content Description:
1 online resource (1 audio file (6hr., 39 min.)) : digital.
Status:
Description

In The Vanishing Face of Gaia, British scientist James Lovelock predicts global warming will lead to a Hot Epoch. Lovelock is best known for formulating the controversial Gaia theory in the 1970s, with Ruth Margulis of the University of Massachusetts, which states that organisms interact with and regulate Earth's surface and atmosphere. We ignore this interaction at our peril. An "unwilling Cassandra," he is nevertheless an "an optimistic pessimist" and thinks we will survive the coming Hot Epoch, but predicts climate change will reduce our population from 9 billion to around one billion or less. "I don't think nine billion is better than one billion," Lovelock writes. He compares humans to the "first photosynthesisers, which, when they first appeared on the planet, caused enormous damage by releasing oxygen -- a nasty, poisonous gas." Oxygen turned out to be beneficial to the life forms that evolved to utilize it, including us, but a global anaerobic ecosystem gave way in the face of this atmospheric change. If simple microbial life forms could effect such a change, why is it hard to believe that humans could do so, too?

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Format:
eAudiobook
Edition:
Unabridged.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781926910543 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book), 1926910540 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book)

Notes

Restrictions on Access
Digital content provided by hoopla.
Participants/Performers
Read by Simon Vance.
Description
In The Vanishing Face of Gaia, British scientist James Lovelock predicts global warming will lead to a Hot Epoch. Lovelock is best known for formulating the controversial Gaia theory in the 1970s, with Ruth Margulis of the University of Massachusetts, which states that organisms interact with and regulate Earth's surface and atmosphere. We ignore this interaction at our peril. An "unwilling Cassandra," he is nevertheless an "an optimistic pessimist" and thinks we will survive the coming Hot Epoch, but predicts climate change will reduce our population from 9 billion to around one billion or less. "I don't think nine billion is better than one billion," Lovelock writes. He compares humans to the "first photosynthesisers, which, when they first appeared on the planet, caused enormous damage by releasing oxygen -- a nasty, poisonous gas." Oxygen turned out to be beneficial to the life forms that evolved to utilize it, including us, but a global anaerobic ecosystem gave way in the face of this atmospheric change. If simple microbial life forms could effect such a change, why is it hard to believe that humans could do so, too?
System Details
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Lovelock, J., & Vance, S. (2011). The vanishing face of Gaia: a final warning. Unabridged. [United States]: Post Hypnotic Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Lovelock, James, 1919- and Simon. Vance. 2011. The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning. [United States]: Post Hypnotic Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Lovelock, James, 1919- and Simon. Vance, The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning. [United States]: Post Hypnotic Press, 2011.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Lovelock, James, and Simon Vance. The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning. Unabridged. [United States]: Post Hypnotic Press, 2011.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
7c82bc3d-7cf2-63a3-544c-64de57cb6bad
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Hoopla Extract Information

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Record Information

Last File Modification TimeSep 01, 2020 11:34:12 PM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeMar 02, 2021 02:27:12 AM

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