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The accordion family: boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition

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Publisher:
Beacon Press
Pub. Date:
Varies, see individual formats and editions
Language:
English
Description
Why are adults in their twenties and thirties stuck in their parents’ homes in the world’s wealthiest countries?
 
There’s no question that globalization has drastically changed the cultural landscape across the world. The cost of living is rising, and high unemployment rates have created an untenable economic climate that has severely compromised the path to adulthood for young people in their twenties and thirties. And there’s no end in sight. Families are hunkering down, expanding the reach of their households to envelop economically vulnerable young adults. Acclaimed sociologist Katherine Newman explores the trend toward a rising number of “accordion families” composed of adult children who will be living off their parents’ retirement savings with little means of their own when the older generation is gone.
 
While the trend crosses the developed world, the cultural and political responses to accordion families differ dramatically. In Japan, there is a sense of horror and fear associated with “parasite singles,” whereas in Italy, the “cult of mammismo,” or mamma’s boys, is common and widely accepted, though the government is rallying against it. Meanwhile, in Spain, frustrated parents and millenials angrily blame politicians and big business for the growing number of youth forced to live at home.
 
Newman’s investigation, conducted in six countries, transports the reader into the homes of accordion families and uncovers fascinating links between globalization and the failure-to-launch trend. Drawing from over three hundred interviews, Newman concludes that nations with weak welfare states have the highest frequency of accordion families while the trend is virtually unknown in the Nordic countries. The United States is caught in between. But globalization is reshaping the landscape of adulthood everywhere, and the consequences are far-reaching in our private lives. In this gripping and urgent book, Newman urges Americans not to simply dismiss the boomerang generation but, rather, to strategize how we can help the younger generation make its own place in the world.
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ISBN:
9780807007433
9780807007440
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Grouping Information

Grouped Work ID5236a44e-1792-5e09-6350-4474e72dc11a
Grouping Titleaccordion family boomerang kids anxious parents and the private toll of global competition
Grouping Authorkatherine s newman
Grouping Categorybook
Grouping LanguageEnglish (eng)
Last Grouping Update2023-03-31 02:08:37AM
Last Indexed2023-03-31 02:47:13AM

Solr Fields

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author
Newman, Katherine S., 1953-
author_display
Newman, Katherine S.
available_at_catalog
Rio Linda
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Rio Linda
display_description
Why are adults in their twenties and thirties stuck in their parents’ homes in the world’s wealthiest countries?
 
There’s no question that globalization has drastically changed the cultural landscape across the world. The cost of living is rising, and high unemployment rates have created an untenable economic climate that has severely compromised the path to adulthood for young people in their twenties and thirties. And there’s no end in sight. Families are hunkering down, expanding the reach of their households to envelop economically vulnerable young adults. Acclaimed sociologist Katherine Newman explores the trend toward a rising number of “accordion families” composed of adult children who will be living off their parents’ retirement savings with little means of their own when the older generation is gone.
 
While the trend crosses the developed world, the cultural and political responses to accordion families differ dramatically. In Japan, there is a sense of horror and fear associated with “parasite singles,” whereas in Italy, the “cult of mammismo,” or mamma’s boys, is common and widely accepted, though the government is rallying against it. Meanwhile, in Spain, frustrated parents and millenials angrily blame politicians and big business for the growing number of youth forced to live at home.
 
Newman’s investigation, conducted in six countries, transports the reader into the homes of accordion families and uncovers fascinating links between globalization and the failure-to-launch trend. Drawing from over three hundred interviews, Newman concludes that nations with weak welfare states have the highest frequency of accordion families while the trend is virtually unknown in the Nordic countries. The United States is caught in between. But globalization is reshaping the landscape of adulthood everywhere, and the consequences are far-reaching in our private lives. In this gripping and urgent book, Newman urges Americans not to simply dismiss the boomerang generation but, rather, to strategize how we can help the younger generation make its own place in the world.
format_catalog
Book
eBook
format_category_catalog
Books
eBook
id
5236a44e-1792-5e09-6350-4474e72dc11a
isbn
9780807007433
9780807007440
itype_catalog
Adult Book Non-Fiction
last_indexed
2023-03-31T09:47:13.155Z
lexile_score
-1
literary_form
Non Fiction
literary_form_full
Non Fiction
local_callnumber_catalog
306.874 N553 2012
owning_library_catalog
Sacramento Public Library
owning_location_catalog
Rio Linda
primary_isbn
9780807007433
publishDate
2012
publisher
Beacon Press
recordtype
grouped_work
subject_facet
Adult children -- Family relationships
Competition, International
Parent and adult child
title_display
The accordion family : boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition
title_full
The Accordion Family Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents,and the Private Toll of Global Competition
The accordion family : boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition / Katherine S. Newman
title_short
The accordion family
title_sub
boomerang kids, anxious parents, and the private toll of global competition
topic_facet
Adult children
Competition, International
Family & Relationships
Family relationships
Nonfiction
Parent and adult child
Sociology

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