We look forward to seeing you on your next visit to the library. Find a location near you.

A thousand days in Venice: an unexpected romance

Book Cover
Your Rating: 0 stars
Star rating for A thousand days in Venice

Average user rating: 5 stars
User ratings:
5 star
 
(1)
4 star
 
(0)
3 star
 
(0)
2 star
 
(0)
1 star
 
(0)
Publisher:
Varies, see individual formats and editions
Publication Date:
Varies, see individual formats and editions
Language:
English

Description

Fernando first sees Marlena across the Piazza San Marco and falls in love from afar. When he sees her again in a Venice café a year later, he knows it is fate. He knows little English; she, a divorced American chef traveling through Italy, speaks only food-based Italian. Marlena thought she was done with romantic love, incapable of intimacy. Yet within months of their first meeting, she has quit her job, sold her house in St. Louis, kissed her two grown sons good-bye, and moved to Venice to marry "the stranger," as she calls Fernando. This deliciously satisfying memoir is filled with the foods and flavors of Italy and peppered with culinary observations and recipes. But the main course here is an enchanting true story about a woman who falls in love with both a man and a city, and finally finds the home she didn't even know she was missing. An American chef and food and wine journalist, Marlena de Blasi has written five memoirs, a novel, and two books about the regional foods of Italy. She lives with her husband in the Umbrian hilltown of Orvieto. Her work has been translated into twenty-six languages. Signora, the Telephone Is for You The small room is filled with German tourists, a few English, and a table or two of locals. It's November 6, 1993, and I arrived in Venice that morning, two friends in tow. We speak quietly together, sipping Amarone. Time passes and the room empties, but I notice that one table, the one farthest away from us, remains occupied. I feel the gentle, noninvasive stare of one of the four men who sit there. I turn my shoulders in, toward my wine, never really looking at the man. Soon the gentlemen go off, and we three are alone in the place. A few minutes pass before a waiter comes by to say there is a telephone call for me. We have yet to announce our arrival to friends, and even if someone knew we were in Venice, they couldn't possibly know we were lunching at Vino Vino. I tell the waiter he's mistaken. "No, signora. Il telefono F per Lei," he insists. "Pronto," I say into the old, orange wall telephone that smells of smoke and men's cologne. "Pronto. Is it possible for you to meet me tomorrow at the same time? It's very important for me," says a deep, deliberate, Italian voice I'd never heard before. In the short silence that follows it somehow clicks that he is one of the men who'd left the restaurant just moments before. Though I've understood fairly well what he has said, I can't respond in Italian. I mumble some linguistic fusion like, "No, grazie. I don't even know who you are," thinking that I really like his voice. The next day we decide to return to Vino Vino because of its convenience to our hotel. I don't think about the man with the beautiful voice. But he's there, and this time he's without his colleagues and looking more than a little like Peter Sellers. We smile. I go off to sit with my friends, and he, seeming not quite to know how to approach us, turns and goes out the door. A few beats pass before the same waiter, now feeling a part of something quite grand, comes to me, eyes direct: "Signora, il telefono F per Lei." There ensues a repeat of yesterday's scene. I go to the phone, and the beautiful voice speaks in very studied English, perhaps thinking it was his language I hadn't understood the day before: "Is it possible for you to meet me tomorrow, alone?" "I don't think so," I fumble, "I think I'm going to Naples." "Oh," is all the beautiful voice can say. "I'm sorry," I say and hang up the phone. We don't go to Naples the next day or the day after, but we do go to the same place for lunch, and Peter Sellers is always there. We never speak a word face to face. He always telephones. And I always tell him I can't meet him. On the fifth day--a Friday--our last full day in Venice, my friends and I spend the morning at Florian mapping the rest...

Also in This Series

More Like This

More Copies In LINK+

Loading LINK+ Copies...

More Details

Contributors:
ISBN:
9781565123212
9781565125896
9781616202750

Reviews from GoodReads

Loading GoodReads Reviews.

Staff View

Grouping Information

Grouped Work ID3ba12c27-dea3-417d-573b-5b096eb88a6d
Grouping Titlethousand days in venice an unexpected romance
Grouping Authormarlena de blasi
Grouping Categorybook
Grouping LanguageEnglish (eng)
Last Grouping Update2024-06-14 02:10:59AM
Last Indexed2024-06-14 02:21:21AM

Solr Fields

accelerated_reader_point_value
0
accelerated_reader_reading_level
0
author
De Blasi, Marlena
author2-role
hoopla digital
author_display
De Blasi, Marlena
available_at_catalog
Central
detailed_location_catalog
Central
display_description
Fernando first sees Marlena across the Piazza San Marco and falls in love from afar. When he sees her again in a Venice café a year later, he knows it is fate. He knows little English; she, a divorced American chef traveling through Italy, speaks only food-based Italian. Marlena thought she was done with romantic love, incapable of intimacy. Yet within months of their first meeting, she has quit her job, sold her house in St. Louis, kissed her two grown sons good-bye, and moved to Venice to marry "the stranger," as she calls Fernando. This deliciously satisfying memoir is filled with the foods and flavors of Italy and peppered with culinary observations and recipes. But the main course here is an enchanting true story about a woman who falls in love with both a man and a city, and finally finds the home she didn't even know she was missing. An American chef and food and wine journalist, Marlena de Blasi has written five memoirs, a novel, and two books about the regional foods of Italy. She lives with her husband in the Umbrian hilltown of Orvieto. Her work has been translated into twenty-six languages. Signora, the Telephone Is for You The small room is filled with German tourists, a few English, and a table or two of locals. It's November 6, 1993, and I arrived in Venice that morning, two friends in tow. We speak quietly together, sipping Amarone. Time passes and the room empties, but I notice that one table, the one farthest away from us, remains occupied. I feel the gentle, noninvasive stare of one of the four men who sit there. I turn my shoulders in, toward my wine, never really looking at the man. Soon the gentlemen go off, and we three are alone in the place. A few minutes pass before a waiter comes by to say there is a telephone call for me. We have yet to announce our arrival to friends, and even if someone knew we were in Venice, they couldn't possibly know we were lunching at Vino Vino. I tell the waiter he's mistaken. "No, signora. Il telefono F per Lei," he insists. "Pronto," I say into the old, orange wall telephone that smells of smoke and men's cologne. "Pronto. Is it possible for you to meet me tomorrow at the same time? It's very important for me," says a deep, deliberate, Italian voice I'd never heard before. In the short silence that follows it somehow clicks that he is one of the men who'd left the restaurant just moments before. Though I've understood fairly well what he has said, I can't respond in Italian. I mumble some linguistic fusion like, "No, grazie. I don't even know who you are," thinking that I really like his voice. The next day we decide to return to Vino Vino because of its convenience to our hotel. I don't think about the man with the beautiful voice. But he's there, and this time he's without his colleagues and looking more than a little like Peter Sellers. We smile. I go off to sit with my friends, and he, seeming not quite to know how to approach us, turns and goes out the door. A few beats pass before the same waiter, now feeling a part of something quite grand, comes to me, eyes direct: "Signora, il telefono F per Lei." There ensues a repeat of yesterday's scene. I go to the phone, and the beautiful voice speaks in very studied English, perhaps thinking it was his language I hadn't understood the day before: "Is it possible for you to meet me tomorrow, alone?" "I don't think so," I fumble, "I think I'm going to Naples." "Oh," is all the beautiful voice can say. "I'm sorry," I say and hang up the phone. We don't go to Naples the next day or the day after, but we do go to the same place for lunch, and Peter Sellers is always there. We never speak a word face to face. He always telephones. And I always tell him I can't meet him. On the fifth day--a Friday--our last full day in Venice, my friends and I spend the morning at Florian mapping the rest...
format_catalog
Book
eBook
format_category_catalog
Books
eBook
id
3ba12c27-dea3-417d-573b-5b096eb88a6d
isbn
9781565123212
9781565125896
9781616202750
itype_catalog
Adult Book Non-Fiction
last_indexed
2024-06-14T09:21:21.951Z
lexile_score
-1
literary_form
Non Fiction
literary_form_full
Non Fiction
local_callnumber_catalog
945.31 D286 2002
owning_library_catalog
Sacramento Public Library
owning_location_catalog
Central
primary_isbn
9781565123212
publishDate
2002
2013
publisher
Algonquin Books
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
recordtype
grouped_work
subject_facet
Autobiography
De Blasi, Marlena -- Homes and haunts -- Italy -- Venice
Electronic books
Italy
Venice (Italy) -- Description and travel
Venice (Italy) -- Social life and customs
title_display
A thousand days in Venice : an unexpected romance
title_full
A Thousand Days in Venice : An Unexpected Romance [electronic resource] / Marlena De Blasi
A Thousand Days in Venice An Unexpected Romance
A thousand days in Venice : an unexpected romance / by Marlena de Blasi
title_short
A thousand days in Venice
title_sub
an unexpected romance
topic_facet
Autobiography
Biography & Autobiography
De Blasi, Marlena
Description and travel
Electronic books
Homes and haunts
Nonfiction
Social life and customs
Travel

Solr Details Tables

item_details

Bib IdItem IdShelf LocationCall NumFormatFormat CategoryNum CopiesIs Order ItemIs eContenteContent SourceeContent URLDetailed StatusLast CheckinLocation
ils:.b1607175x.i67861611Central945.31 D286 20021falsefalseOn Shelfcenag
overdrive:e8f3c58e-5843-4729-99bc-3a2717143d8f-2Online OverDrive CollectionOnline OverDriveeBookeBook1falsetrueOverDriveAvailable Online
hoopla:MWT15983808Online Hoopla CollectionOnline HooplaeBookeBook1falsetrueHooplahttps://www.hoopladigital.com/title/15956897?utm_source=MARC&Lid=hh4435Available Online

record_details

Bib IdFormatFormat CategoryEditionLanguagePublisherPublication DatePhysical DescriptionAbridged
ils:.b1607175xBookBooks1st edEnglishAlgonquin Books of Chapel Hill2002272 p. ; 19 cm.
overdrive:e8f3c58e-5843-4729-99bc-3a2717143d8feBookeBookEnglishAlgonquin Books2002
hoopla:MWT15983808eBookeBookEnglishAlgonquin Books20131 online resource (288 pages)

scoping_details_catalog

Bib IdItem IdGrouped StatusStatusLocally OwnedAvailableHoldableBookableIn Library Use OnlyLibrary OwnedHoldable PTypesBookable PTypesLocal Url
ils:.b1607175x.i67861611On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruetruetruefalsetrue0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24, 26, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 12011
overdrive:e8f3c58e-5843-4729-99bc-3a2717143d8f-2Available OnlineAvailable Onlinefalsetruetruefalsefalsefalse
hoopla:MWT15983808Available OnlineAvailable Onlinefalsetruefalsefalsefalsefalse