New holds can be placed for curbside pickup locations only. Sacramento Public Library locations remained closed to all but select curbside pickup locations in response to public health recommendations. See the Library Coronavirus Act

Burn the ice: The American Culinary Revolution and Its End

Book Cover
Average Rating
Publisher:
Varies, see individual formats and editions
Pub. Date:
2019.
Language:
English
Description
"Inspiring" —Danny Meyer, CEO, Union Square Hospitality Group; Founder, Shake Shack; and author, Setting the Table James Beard Award-winning food journalist Kevin Alexander traces an exhilarating golden age in American diningOver the past decade, Kevin Alexander saw American dining turned on its head. Starting in 2006, the food world underwent a transformation as the established gatekeepers of American culinary creativity in New York City and the Bay Area were forced to contend with Portland, Oregon. Its new, no-holds-barred, casual fine-dining style became a template for other cities, and a culinary revolution swept across America. Traditional ramen shops opened in Oklahoma City. Craft cocktail speakeasies appeared in Boise. Poke bowls sprung up in Omaha. Entire neighborhoods, like Williamsburg in Brooklyn, and cities like Austin, were suddenly unrecognizable to long-term residents, their names becoming shorthand for the so-called hipster movement. At the same time, new media companies such as Eater and Serious Eats launched to chronicle and cater to this developing scene, transforming nascent star chefs into proper celebrities. Emerging culinary television hosts like Anthony Bourdain inspired a generation to use food as the lens for different cultures. It seemed, for a moment, like a glorious belle epoque of eating and drinking in America. And then it was over.To tell this story, Alexander journeys through the travails and triumphs of a number of key chefs, bartenders, and activists, as well as restaurants and neighborhoods whose fortunes were made during this veritable gold rush—including Gabriel Rucker, an originator of the 2006 Portland restaurant scene; Tom Colicchio of Gramercy Tavern and Top Chef fame; as well as hugely influential figures, such as André Prince Jeffries of Prince's Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville; and Carolina barbecue pitmaster Rodney Scott. He writes with rare energy, telling a distinctly American story, at once timeless and cutting-edge, about unbridled creativity and ravenous ambition. To "burn the ice" means to melt down whatever remains in a kitchen's ice machine at the end of the night. Or, at the bar, to melt the ice if someone has broken a glass in the well. It is both an end and a beginning. It is the firsthand story of a revolution in how Americans eat and drink.
Also in This Series
More Like This
More Details
ISBN:
9780525558026
9780525558033
9781984888891
Reviews from GoodReads
Loading GoodReads Reviews.
Staff View

Grouping Information

Grouped Work ID01fd964a-b0c5-4e2d-d8d6-d01a5167b61e
Grouping Titleburn the ice the american culinary revolution and its end
Grouping Authoralexander kevin
Grouping Categorybook
Last Grouping Update2020-06-01 02:32:49AM
Last Indexed2020-06-01 02:38:20AM

Solr Details

accelerated_reader_point_value0
accelerated_reader_reading_level0
authorKevin Alexander
author_displayKevin Alexander
available_at_catalogNorth Highlands-Antelope
detailed_location_catalogNorth Highlands-Antelope
display_description"Inspiring" —Danny Meyer, CEO, Union Square Hospitality Group; Founder, Shake Shack; and author, Setting the Table

James Beard Award-winning food journalist Kevin Alexander traces an exhilarating golden age in American dining

Over the past decade, Kevin Alexander saw American dining turned on its head. Starting in 2006, the food world underwent a transformation as the established gatekeepers of American culinary creativity in New York City and the Bay Area were forced to contend with Portland, Oregon. Its new, no-holds-barred, casual fine-dining style became a template for other cities, and a culinary revolution swept across America. Traditional ramen shops opened in Oklahoma City. Craft cocktail speakeasies appeared in Boise. Poke bowls sprung up in Omaha. Entire neighborhoods, like Williamsburg in Brooklyn, and cities like Austin, were suddenly unrecognizable to long-term residents, their names becoming shorthand for the so-called hipster movement. At the same time, new media companies such as Eater and Serious Eats launched to chronicle and cater to this developing scene, transforming nascent star chefs into proper celebrities. Emerging culinary television hosts like Anthony Bourdain inspired a generation to use food as the lens for different cultures. It seemed, for a moment, like a glorious belle epoque of eating and drinking in America. And then it was over.
To tell this story, Alexander journeys through the travails and triumphs of a number of key chefs, bartenders, and activists, as well as restaurants and neighborhoods whose fortunes were made during this veritable gold rush—including Gabriel Rucker, an originator of the 2006 Portland restaurant scene; Tom Colicchio of Gramercy Tavern and Top Chef fame; as well as hugely influential figures, such as André Prince Jeffries of Prince's Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville; and Carolina barbecue pitmaster Rodney Scott.

He writes with rare energy, telling a distinctly American story, at once timeless and cutting-edge, about unbridled creativity and ravenous ambition. To "burn the ice" means to melt down whatever remains in a kitchen's ice machine at the end of the night. Or, at the bar, to melt the ice if someone has broken a glass in the well. It is both an end and a beginning. It is the firsthand story of a revolution in how Americans eat and drink.
format_catalogBook
eAudiobook
eBook
format_category_catalogAudio Books
Books
eBook
id01fd964a-b0c5-4e2d-d8d6-d01a5167b61e
isbn9780525558026
9780525558033
9781984888891
item_details
Bib IdItem IdShelf LocCall NumFormatFormat CategoryNum CopiesIs Order ItemIs eContenteContent SourceeContent FileeContent URLsubformatDetailed StatusLast CheckinLocationSub-location
overdrive:28c1d196-9783-484d-a4f2-9af110e148c0-2Online OverDrive CollectionOnline OverDriveeBookeBook1falsetrueOverDriveAdobe EPUB eBook, Kindle Book, OverDrive ReadChecked Out
overdrive:79bbbb61-4a3d-4852-a50f-99bf329033cb-2Online OverDrive CollectionOnline OverDriveeAudiobookAudio Books1falsetrueOverDriveOverDrive MP3 Audiobook, OverDrive ListenAvailable Online
ils:.b26077887.i81522769North Highlands-Antelope641.50973 A376 20191falsefalseOn Shelfnhiag
ils:.b26077887.i81522733North Highlands-Antelope641.50973 A376 20191falsefalseOn Shelfnhiag
itype_catalogAdult Book Non-Fiction
last_indexed2020-06-01T09:38:20.948Z
lexile_score-1
literary_formNon Fiction
literary_form_fullEssays
Non Fiction
local_callnumber_catalog641.50973 A376 2019
local_time_since_added_catalogYear
owning_library_catalogSacramento Public Library
owning_location_catalogNorth Highlands-Antelope
primary_isbn9780525558026
publishDate2019
record_details
Bib IdFormatFormat CategoryEditionLanguagePublisherPublication DatePhysical Description
overdrive:28c1d196-9783-484d-a4f2-9af110e148c0eBookeBookEnglishPenguin Publishing Group2019
overdrive:79bbbb61-4a3d-4852-a50f-99bf329033cbeAudiobookAudio BooksEnglishPenguin Random House Audio Publishing Group2019
ils:.b26077887BookBooksEnglishPenguin Press, 2019.371 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
recordtypegrouped_work
scoping_details_catalog
Bib IdItem IdGrouped StatusStatusLocally OwnedAvailableHoldableBookableIn Library Use OnlyLibrary OwnedHoldable PTypesBookable PTypesLocal Url
overdrive:28c1d196-9783-484d-a4f2-9af110e148c0-2Checked OutChecked Outfalsefalsetruefalsefalsefalse
overdrive:79bbbb61-4a3d-4852-a50f-99bf329033cb-2Available OnlineAvailable Onlinefalsetruetruefalsefalsefalse
ils:.b26077887.i81522769On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruetruefalsefalsetrue0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39
ils:.b26077887.i81522733On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruetruefalsefalsetrue0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39
subject_facetCooks -- United States
Creative ability in cooking -- United States
Food industry and trade -- United States
title_displayBurn the ice : the American culinary revolution and its end
title_fullBurn the Ice The American Culinary Revolution and Its End
Burn the ice : the American culinary revolution and its end / Kevin Alexander
title_shortBurn the ice
title_subThe American Culinary Revolution and Its End
topic_facetCooking & Food
Cooks
Creative ability in cooking
Essays
Food industry and trade
Nonfiction
Sociology